Research

Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read?

This week the EdFive is full-on digitally focused.  The first entry may seem like a big, fat, PAUSE button, but be sure to read all the way through. The differences aren’t as significant as headlines indicate and the new iPad has “page folding” technology.  More research needed… [EF]

I received a Kindle for my birthday, and enjoying “light reading,” in addition to the dense science I read for work, I immediately loaded it with mysteries by my favorite authors. But I soon found that I had difficulty recalling the names of characters from chapter to chapter. At first, I attributed the lapses to a scary reality of getting older — but then I discovered that I didn’t have this problem when I read paperbacks.

When I discussed my quirky recall with friends and colleagues, I found out I wasn’t the only one who suffered from “e-book moments.” Online, I discovered that Google’s Larry Page himself had concerns about research showing that on-screen reading is measurably slower than reading on paper.

This seems like a particularly troubling trend for academia, where digital books are slowly overtaking the heavy tomes I used to lug around.

FULL ARTICLE: Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read?

POST SOURCE: Healthland –  TIME

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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This is your Brain on Games…

Two-fold value for this little picture: 1) Help us see the actual neurological benefits and liabilities of gaming; 2) Start a fun conversation with students – who wouldn’t want to start a debate about the rostral anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala?  There’s even graphic data showing differences between boys and girls.  Worth a look. [EF]

Video games have both positive and negative effects on the human brain. They can be used to educate through repetition and feedback, but they also have some less-positive side effects…

FULL ARTICLE: Infographic: The Neurology of Gaming – HOME – Edgalaxy: Where Education and Technology Meet

POST SOURCE: EdGalaxy.com

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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Does Female Representation in Government = Peace?

Do you know what the Global Peace Index is?  Would you believe someone who said they could “prove” the correlation between women representatives and a nation’s peacefulness?  If you’ve got one of those “dead” advisories with 10th graders, show this chart and watch the sparks fly! [EF]

Today’s news that Senator Olympia Snowe, the perennially moderate Republican from Maine, would not be seeking re-election has many politicos and pundits wondering whether the GOP can hold that seat…

…This got me thinking about the impact of female representation in government upon various characteristics of a society, particularly with regard to a country’s violent or peaceful tendencies. There’s an interesting dataset called the Global Peace Index (GPI), a product of the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP)….

…What you find, if you compare a country’s female representation in government to its GPI score, is a downward trend….

FULL ARTICLE:  Chicken or Egg: Does female representation in Government lead to Peace?

POST SOURCE: 10x10Act.org

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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Children’s A.D.D. Drugs Don’t Work Long-Term – NYTimes.com

This week the EdFive takes a long look at ADD and the use of Ritalin. L Alan Sroufe, Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota, touched off a lively exchange last week with his stance that Ritalin’s “gone wrong” in the NYT Sunday Review…{EF}

THREE million children in this country take drugs for problems in focusing. Toward the end of last year, many of their parents were deeply alarmed because there was a shortage of drugs like Ritalin and Adderall that they considered absolutely essential to their children’s functioning.

But are these drugs really helping children? Should we really keep expanding the number of prescriptions filled? In 30 years there has been a twentyfold increase in the consumption of drugs for attention-deficit disorder.

CONTINUE TO FULL ARTICLE: Children’s A.D.D. Drugs Don’t Work Long-Term

Post Source: NYTimes Sunday Review

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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What’s Wrong With the Teenage Mind?

Harry Campbell

In this week’s posts we’ll start with the Journal, take a turn through New York, whisk through gender-equity, learn about life from a science teacher, and then preview a new search engine. Just an average week in the life of a teacher…

“What was he thinking?” It’s the familiar cry of bewildered parents trying to understand why their teenagers act the way they do.

How does the boy who can thoughtfully explain the reasons never to drink and drive end up in a drunken crash? Why does the girl who knows all about birth control find herself pregnant by a boy she doesn’t even like? What happened to the gifted, imaginative child who excelled through high school but then dropped out of college, drifted from job to job and now lives in his parents’ basement?

Adolescence has always been troubled, but for reasons that are somewhat mysterious, puberty is now kicking in at an earlier and earlier age. A leading theory points to changes in energy balance as children eat more and move less….

…What happens when children reach puberty earlier and adulthood later? The answer is: a good deal of teenage weirdness. Fortunately, developmental psychologists and neuroscientists are starting to explain the foundations of that weirdness.

LINK: What’s Wrong With the Teenage Mind?

Post Source: EdWeek: K-12 Talent Manager

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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