Posts Tagged With: brain research

This is your Brain on Games…

Two-fold value for this little picture: 1) Help us see the actual neurological benefits and liabilities of gaming; 2) Start a fun conversation with students – who wouldn’t want to start a debate about the rostral anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala?  There’s even graphic data showing differences between boys and girls.  Worth a look. [EF]

Video games have both positive and negative effects on the human brain. They can be used to educate through repetition and feedback, but they also have some less-positive side effects…

FULL ARTICLE: Infographic: The Neurology of Gaming – HOME – Edgalaxy: Where Education and Technology Meet

POST SOURCE: EdGalaxy.com

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Categories: Blogosphere, Research | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Neil Burgess: How your brain tells you where you are | Video on TED.com

This is a fun one you could share with students in a Science class or during an advisory period. [EF]

How do you remember where you parked your car? How do you know if you’re moving in the right direction? Neuroscientist Neil Burgess studies the neural mechanisms that map the space around us, and how they link to memory and imagination.

At University College in London, Neil Burgess researches how patterns of electrical activity in brain cells guide us through space.

LINK: Neil Burgess: How your brain tells you where you are

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Categories: Ted Talks | Tags: , | Leave a comment

The Divided Brain

You may already know that the theory about the right half of your brain being the imaginative, emotional half, while the left brain is the rational, detached half has largely been debunked. It persists because it is such a handy metaphor for describing the human condition. However there are differences between the two halves of our brain, which is described brilliantly by Iain McGilchrist, and superbly animated by RSAnimate. It is eleven minutes that both halves of my brain truly enjoyed – Jason Ohler on the 21st Century Fluency Project

LINK: RSA Animate – The Divided Brain – YouTube.

Post Source: TedTalks via 21st Century Fluency Project

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