Books

Hester Pryne vs. Eowyn

This Top 10 list comes from Emily Temple in Flavorwire. Would you agree that Hermione Granger, The Wife of Bath, Jane Eyre, and Hua Mulan should make the cut? (Trying not to mention a certain ubiquitous Katniss and save that for the next post – clearly failing at that!) [EF]

Since March is Women’s History Month, we’ve been thinking a lot about the women who have had positive and lasting impacts on our lives — and perhaps not surprisingly for a bunch of literary geeks like us, we’ve realized that many of them are fictional. For all the hullabaloo about the dearth of strong female characters in modern culture, thankfully there are some wonderfully powerful, kick-ass maidens that have inspired us with their strength, self-discovery, and incredible brilliance over the years…

FULL ARTICLE:  10 MOST Powerful Female Characters in Literature

POST SOURCE: Flavorwire

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You may know Katniss, but do you know Liesel, the Book Thief?

And here’s a look at modern books with strong female characters.  Relying on our old friends at CommonSenseMedia.org, the list is subdivided by age groups: from pre-school to teenager. [EF]

If you think “girl books” are just about princesses, romance, gossipy schoolgirls, and vampires, think again. There are plenty of great books featuring strong female main characters in compelling stories that are sure to appeal to boys as well as girls. Don’t assume that a girl’s name in a book’s title or a picture of a girl on the cover means the book is for girls only. It’s what’s inside that counts…

FULL ARTICLE:  Strong Female Characters in Books

POST SOURCE: commonsensemedia.org

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John Green’s ‘The Fault in Our Stars’

Here’s a quick look at a book that many of our students are reading…

John Green is one of my favorite young-adult fiction writers. I think I’ve mentioned my fondness for his 2009 novel Paper Towns, which follows a boy’s road trip in search of his childhood best friend.

This month Green’s latest effort, The Fault in Our Stars (Dutton Juvenile), arrived in stores. The premise involves a teen with cancer who falls for an attractive, funny and one-legged dude named Augustus.

LINK: John Green’s ‘The Fault in Our Stars’

Post Source: USAToday PopCandy

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This Beautiful Life – By Helen Schulman

This novel came out last summer, but many are just now getting around to reading it.  While the topic is timely and relevant, the story is hard-hitting and has adult themes. Here’s the link to the review

Helen Schulman’s latest novel tells the story of the Bergamots, a family of four whose expensive new Manhattan life comes crashing down when 15-year-old Jake forwards to a friend a sexually explicit video made for him, unsolicited, by a 13-year-old girl named Daisy Cavanaugh. As the video, forwarded again and again, goes viral, the tabloid media go bananas, linking Jake and Daisy in an ominous and humiliating celebrity. What can the future hold for unformed, vulnerable kids who bumble their way into the lowliest realm of the permanent record that is the Internet?

LINK: This Beautiful Life – By Helen Schulman – Book Review – NYTimes.com.

Post Source: NYTimes Sunday Book Review

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Turning a teen boy into a bookworm

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a teen boy in possession of a free summer must be in want of anything but a book.

But those who live and work with them say it’s not that teen boys don’t like to read, it’s that typical Young Adult novels don’t appeal to them.”

Kathy Ceceri, of Albany Times Union, reports on Colleen Mondor’s efforts to overcome that obstacle….

Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/living/article/Turning-a-teen-boy-into-a-bookworm-1430485.php#ixzz1R4Qpuruk

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