Lesson Plans

Homerun Hitters and Statistics

Now that baseball season is into full swing, here’s a lesson using homerun totals.  You can download a word version of the lesson plan as well.  The video also discusses how to use boxplots. [EF]

Homerun Statistics

FULL ARTICLE: Statistical Analysis & Baseball

POST SOURCE: The Teaching Channel

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How Geniuses Think

Easy read. In fact, you could take the key components and easily turn this into a lesson for your students.  Upper School students could definitely handle the article itself.  [EF]

How do geniuses come up with ideas? What is common to the thinking style that produced “Mona Lisa,” as well as the one that spawned the theory of relativity? What characterizes the thinking strategies of the Einsteins, Edisons, daVincis, Darwins, Picassos, Michelangelos, Galileos, Freuds, and Mozarts of history? What can we learn from them?

FULL ARTICLE: How Geniuses Think

POST SOURCE: Psychology Today

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Mental Maps and the World

This week’s lesson plan suggestion comes from National Geographic. We’re all familiar with the upside-down maps of the world (McArthur’s probably most known version), but here are some other sample that could be used to teach math (proportions), political analysis (point-of-view), geography, and more. [EF]

Today I noticed a humorous map of the U.S. that highlighted the following of college football in every state, according to the institutions that had the greatest number of fans. I thought it was very clever and probably took a good amount of knowledge to draw up. For instance, in my home state of Virginia, the map shows a greater proportion of maroon (representing Virginia Tech) than blue (for the University of Virginia, VT’s collegiate rival) which is very true. Then I got to thinking about what it was that controlled how this informal cartographer decided to assign the appropriate amounts of school colors all over the 49 states–the absence of Alaska is conspicuous…

Beyond the world of NCAA sports, I remember seeing many maps created simply from a specific perception of the outside world, whether it was truthful (not usually), humorous, or meant as a way to spread awareness of an issue. Here are a few examples of other “mental maps” that I came across…

FULL ARTICLE:  Mental Maps and the World

POST SOURCE:  My WonderfulWorld Blog (National Geographic)

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An Interactive Strategy for Reading Assignments

Jill Spencer offers a reading strategy that can be used in ALL subjects, as well as ways to differentiate the activity based on skill level and/or interest.  PLUS, there’s a link to a google search that lists other ways teachers have implemented this strategy.

Student: “I don’t get it.”

Teacher: “What don’t you understand?”

Student: “Any of it!”

Sound familiar? When it comes time for class discussion about a reading assignment, teachers are often disappointed by the lack of student participation. The kids don’t have a clue what they should say and desperately hope the teacher doesn’t call on them.

LINK: An Interactive Strategy for Reading Assignments in All Content Areas

Post Source: Middle Level iNsider from the Association of Middle Level Education

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Tip of the Week – Six Great Ways to Publish Student Work

While the post comes from a Social Studies teacher, the publishing techniques described can be used in all subjects and for all ages.  Check these out before you design your next unit lesson plan…

We know that the world is moving online and that to prepare our kids for that world, we need to train them to use that world’s tools. We know that publishing student work beyond the classroom encourages authentically engaged kids who create high-quality work. We know that integration of writing and visuals increases cognitive activity.

Yeah. So?

So we need to be publishing more student work online. But where and how?

LINK: Tip of the Week – Six Great Ways to Publish Student Work.

Post Source: History Tech

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