Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read?

This week the EdFive is full-on digitally focused.  The first entry may seem like a big, fat, PAUSE button, but be sure to read all the way through. The differences aren’t as significant as headlines indicate and the new iPad has “page folding” technology.  More research needed… [EF]

I received a Kindle for my birthday, and enjoying “light reading,” in addition to the dense science I read for work, I immediately loaded it with mysteries by my favorite authors. But I soon found that I had difficulty recalling the names of characters from chapter to chapter. At first, I attributed the lapses to a scary reality of getting older — but then I discovered that I didn’t have this problem when I read paperbacks.

When I discussed my quirky recall with friends and colleagues, I found out I wasn’t the only one who suffered from “e-book moments.” Online, I discovered that Google’s Larry Page himself had concerns about research showing that on-screen reading is measurably slower than reading on paper.

This seems like a particularly troubling trend for academia, where digital books are slowly overtaking the heavy tomes I used to lug around.

FULL ARTICLE: Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read?

POST SOURCE: Healthland –  TIME

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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Categories: Journals, Magazines, & Websites, Research | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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