Author Archives: edfivecs90

What did Amy Chua actually mean to say?

And we’re back.  We’ll comment on today’s NYTimes Magazine focus on the brain next week.  Meantime, during all of the Tiger Mom hoo-ha, did you read the book yourself? If you didn’t, did you ever wonder what message SHE wanted you to get?  Our friends at NAIS posted this graphic recording of her conference speech on their Facebook page (April 17th).

NAIS FACEBOOK PAGE

Amy Chua Graphic

**Editor’s Note:  Click on links within the post field.  The post “title” hyperlink opens another window in Edfive.**

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Grading Overload: 12 Time-Saving Assessment Strategies

Most of these are common sense reminders, but there’s particularly interesting suggestion about choosing one element to grade for a major assessment. [EF]

There’s a faculty meeting tomorrow, a parent-teacher conference the next day, you have to prep your materials for that project next week, and – almost forgot – you still haven’t graded the assignments from two weeks ago, plus a new stack of papers walks in with today’s students. And somewhere in all of this you might actually want to see your family or catch a movie while it’s still in the theater.

Sound familiar? Don’t despair – try these tips to avoid grading overload:

FULL ARTICLE: Grading Overload: 12 Time-Saving Assessment Strategies

POST SOURCE: TeachHub

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Homerun Hitters and Statistics

Now that baseball season is into full swing, here’s a lesson using homerun totals.  You can download a word version of the lesson plan as well.  The video also discusses how to use boxplots. [EF]

Homerun Statistics

FULL ARTICLE: Statistical Analysis & Baseball

POST SOURCE: The Teaching Channel

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How Geniuses Think

Easy read. In fact, you could take the key components and easily turn this into a lesson for your students.  Upper School students could definitely handle the article itself.  [EF]

How do geniuses come up with ideas? What is common to the thinking style that produced “Mona Lisa,” as well as the one that spawned the theory of relativity? What characterizes the thinking strategies of the Einsteins, Edisons, daVincis, Darwins, Picassos, Michelangelos, Galileos, Freuds, and Mozarts of history? What can we learn from them?

FULL ARTICLE: How Geniuses Think

POST SOURCE: Psychology Today

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Why I No Longer Use Groups in the Classroom

Yes, a provocative title, but in this piece, Greg Graham is really just talking about how he teaches students to write essays.  Still, for those of us who are frequently using team/cooperative/group settings, it’s worth taking a moment to reflect on this technique. [EF]

A recent New Yorker article entitled “Groupthink” takes a fascinating look at the concept of brainstorming. According to author Jonah Lehrer, brainstorming was introduced in the late 1940s as a creativity-inducing practice by advertising guru Alex Osborn in his book Your Creative Power. The book was a surprise bestseller, and Osborn’s ideas about brainstorming, according to Lehrer, became “the most widely used creativity technique in the world.” Whether in business, politics, entertainment, or education, group-thinking was and still is regarded as the ultimate path to ingenuity and productivity.

One small problem: Numerous studies over the years have demonstrated that brainstorming doesn’t work, at least not as Osborn defined it

FULL ARTICLE: Why I No Longer Use Groups in the Classroom

POST SOURCE: EdWeek Teacher

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